Language is an evolving animal. That’s why the world needs lexicographers, to update dictionaries so they reflect the language of the time. This paper trail leaves a fascinating historical record, one that Merriam-Webster lexicographer Kory Stamper decided travel down when tasked with updating the definition of the word “b*tch”. Stamper noticed there was no label in the dictionary that marked the word as a pejorative. It has meant a lot of different things since it first came into use, sometime before the 12th century, as a term for female dog. Stamper runs through the history of the people this term has applied to, its varied uses, and the muted, bureaucratic struggle that kept it from being marked as an offensive term until the 1990s. Kory Stamper is the author of Word by Word: The Secret Life of Dictionaries.

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Transcript: So I was doing some work in our collegiate dictionary, and I was doing some reading in the letter B, and I ran across the entry for “bitch”. And I noticed that the entry for bitch had many meanings but didn’t actually have any labels on it that said those meanings were offensive or vulgar or derogatory, which really surprised me.

So I went through this deep dig through our archives to see why that is. And the word “bitch” was originally used of a female dog, and that goes back all the way into Old English over a thousand years, but by about 1400 it had also come to refer to a lewd woman or an immoral woman. And then shortly thereafter it was also used to refer to a domineering woman or a woman who was like a man.

And you see this really interesting proliferation of meaning for the word bitch in the 1500s, 1600s, and 1700s where “bitch” when applied to a woman is always pretty much negative, and “bitch” is also applied to men at this point.

So gay men were called “bitch” back in the 1600s. And weak and ineffectual men were called “bitch”. So it’s really fascinating as you see this movement through history, and historical dictionaries did say “bitch” was the worst thing that you could possibly call a woman. They ignored all of the uses of men, which is also a really fascinating thing. No one entered those uses for hundreds and hundreds of years in their dictionaries even though they were very common.

So what happened is I really wanted to know why this didn’t have a label on it. So I went through and looked back at our defining history, because we have all that history in the office. And I found that really from about the 1930s onward, there were different editors who argued that we include any sense that refer to men because that was important; that was historical use. And those notes were often rejected, so nothing appeared for a while.

And then in the 60s the person who was in charge of editing the entry for bitch was a woman, and she had included in her notes some strong labels saying that this was an abusive term, and those got dropped. They were dropped for no apparent reason.

So then we come up into the ’90s which is when the last big revision to the word bitch was made for our collegiate dictionary, and it gets a usage note that says it’s used as “a generalized term of abuse”. So okay, now we have a usage note there. It’s not the same as saying it’s offensive or vulgar, but we’re heading in the right direction.

And the two times in the modern company history where that was done, it was done at the instance of a woman, someone who had actually lived what it’s like to be called a bitch constantly.

So what’s really fascinating is you see this arc of meaning that is very clearly derogatory. And lexicographers just didn’t, I mean in general didn’t, pick it up for a while. If they entered the word at all they didn’t actually define it. They just said it was a terrible word to call a woman. Or once they started defining it there were enough issues around—there were enough instances of “bitch” used as a reclaimed slur: Women saying, you know, “Well I’m a tough bitch,” which reads like a positive thing.

So it’s this very interesting interplay of: here’s a negative word and everyone sort of knows in their gut that it’s a negative word. You don’t call a woman a bitch. But women are calling themselves bitches, and it’s meant as a compliment to themselves.

So how do lexicographers deal with that, with this idea that slurs get reclaimed? And every person has a different reaction to the word bitch and that depends on the context it’s used in, who uses it, what kind of mood they’re in when they hear it, whether it’s directed at them or not, whether they’re using it of someone else. So it’s a really difficult thing as a lexicographer to come up with just a one line definition that covers all of those varied uses.

579 COMMENTS

  1. Comment section confuses me. I don't understand what the fuck is happening. Do people not watch video? Do people watch video and not bother to try to understand video? What what the the fuck fuck is happening?

  2. why are people arguing over things that barely have anything to do with it on a video about the lexicography of a word?

  3. Holy damn. A lot of you need to settle down. The point of this video was really quite simple, and I'll explain it. There are several words in the dictionary that can have vulgar, degrading, and offensive meanings, and several of those are listed as exactly that. The issue here is the word brought up in the video is not labeled as a vulgar usage, when it clearly should be. The arguments being put forth against this video are absurd, trite, and also insulting in nature if you have any common decency.

  4. Not to get off topic or anything, but you have to do something about that white background.  Every time she raised a hand up, it looked like part of her was disappearing.  Also, can you put the end-of-the-video links on AFTER she's done talking?  I'm looking at a link box covering up her face for the last few sentences, as if she's in witness protection or something.

  5. Yeah! Lexicography, bitch!

    Y'all trippin in the comments if you saw this as anything other than a history lesson.

  6. Why does a stem-cell divide into a progenitor and another stem-cell once it has committed? Is the new stem-cell a completely blank slate or is it still in the mode of the progenitor?

  7. The "big think", Channel has unfortunately developed cancer. The prognosis isn't good. It's the worst kind of cancer, Feminism.

  8. The only thing that disturbs me about this video is that I live in a world where someone gets paid to be a "lexicographer"

  9. A better argument would've included things like "But "Bastard" was notated this way." That way there's a basis of comparison. Otherwise, it looks like you picked a subject and a conclusion and went looking for supporting data. What I find also fascinating is the fequency with which you mention female editors of the dictionary. I think that'd be a pretty awesome story to tell.

  10. I respect her lingual agility. Few can dance around a feminist agenda so well.

    But the hair and lack of makeup was a dead giveaway. Even men apply makeup of sorts for things like this.

  11. all the people who seem to think this is some kind of feminist complaint. All she does is raise an interesting historical point. I fail to see the feminist angle

  12. i mean, you can retake any derogitory or offensivw term and flip it to induce a sense of pride, in a sense, so ya?

  13. It's interesting how sexual people use to consider the word while nowadays the word's meaning has switched to non-sex specific ones like, "one who nags," or "one who lets fear run their actions," and, in a lot of story telling cases, just a place holder for unknown titles or names of people.

  14. It's okay my fellow sensitive white male snowflakes ❄️. She didn't mention "feminism". It's okay. Don't get triggered!

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